Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

  1. You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 
           

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

Craft With Conscience: Katherine Entis

Craft With Conscience

'Craft With Conscience' began in early 2016 as a weekly Instagram series dedicated to sharing the work of other creatives and as a platform to openly discuss certain aspects of ethical art-making and consuming in the age of the internet and social media.  

This series arose out of my own frustrations related to seeing my work constantly copied stitch-for-stitch, sold without permission, and credited to other people.  Rather than wallowing in unproductive negative emotions, I wanted to find a way to bring this common issue to light in a positive way.  My solution was to share the work of artists, crafters, designers, and makers who I greatly admire for their originality and dedication. Initially, I shared work similar in materials or subject matter to my own, having heard the argument, "There are only so many ways to stitch plants, I'm not copying you..." one too many times.  The truth is, no matter what the medium or subject, every artist from hobby crafter to professional painter has their own perspective and voice. It takes effort to develop one's visual vocabulary and it can be disheartening when your's is taken and misused by other individuals and sometimes larger companies.

All that being said, now is an incredible time for working artists because of the vast resources of the internet including sources of inspiration, the ability to reach a large and global audience, and as a community building tool. As you may know, I love sharing my work on Instagram and following other makers. It's a wonderful way to connect with other artists, be inspired, and feel supported, but we all need to be aware of how we use these resources and what effect it may have on others.

Since the start of 2016, 'Craft With Conscience' has grown and evolved just like any other creative pursuit and has recently expanded to include short interviews with featured artists. I've asked participating artists a series of questions about their studio process, sources of inspiration, and how image-sharing sites like Instagram and Pinterest influence and affect them. I hope you read on to see what they have to say!

Craft With Conscience: Katherine Entis

Sarah Benning

Katherine Entis // Designer and Textile Artist // Portland OR


Katherine Entis is a designer, fiber artist and founder of Soft Century out of Portland, Oregon.  Influenced by memories of touch and sight Katherine's work acts as studies of material, color, and composition. Drawing from landscapes both real and imagined, her recent series of knit paintings are an exploration of color and texture that come together as a collection to tell a larger story.

check out more of amazing work at Soft Century or her Instagram.

 Photo credit: Ricardo Nagoaka

Photo credit: Ricardo Nagoaka

studio.jpg

1. I began my #CraftWithConscience series as a way to simultaneously promote the work of other makers and to discuss the complicated issues surrounding creative inspiration and developing one’s own visual vocabulary. The internet is an ever growing fixture in many artists’ lives and businesses, could you talk about the role the internet plays in your artistic and professional life?

The internet has allowed me to connect with makers from around the world. We share business information, contacts, or even just encouragement. Many of my Instagram friends have become real friends who have shown me how to move forward when I've felt stuck. To see so many talented people working hard is inspiring.

When it comes to finding new creative works, social media is a great roadmap to what's happening at any given moment. It's always there for a quick source of visual stimulus, but, more importantly, points me toward works, stores, and shows to go see in person. Pictures and videos are great, but especially in textiles, there's no substitute for being able to get up close and touch something.

 Photo credit: Ricardo Nagoaka

Photo credit: Ricardo Nagoaka

2. Where do you find inspiration for your work?  In what ways has the internet and/or social media impacted your design process?

For me, social media is largely a source of ideas for sales models, styling, and marketing, which are a huge part of trying to build a sustainable business. When it comes to my products, however, I find a lot of inspiration in other mediums like furniture, film, animation, illustration, and painting, or even less direct sources like food or landscapes. Before textiles, I studied painting, so that approach to composition has always been a big part of my creative process.

 Photo credit: Ricardo Nagoaka

Photo credit: Ricardo Nagoaka

3. How have you, as an artist, found your creative voice?

I do my best work when I am able to trust the creative process and not worry too much about outcomes. It took me a long time to truly understand that most of the ideas I have will end up in the trash can--metaphorically, of course! I never throw out material if I can avoid it.

You can't force a good idea. One of the ways that I learned to accept that was by focusing on quantifiable goals and not worrying too much about outcomes. So instead of saying, "I need to make my best pillowcase ever," I try to say, "I'm going to weave two pillowcases by Wednesday." I think long-term success is more about staying focused and working hard than making something that you absolutely love every time you sit down.

 Photo credit: Kennett Mohrman with art direction by Elizabeth Sonenfeld

Photo credit: Kennett Mohrman with art direction by Elizabeth Sonenfeld

4. Sites like Pinterest and Instagram are popular places for artists’ to share their own work. They also act as public visual archives, often leading to creative work by others that walks the line between ‘inspiration’ and ‘infringement.’ Have you encountered copies of your work online and how does it affect you? What are your strategies for dealing with it?

Fortunately, my work hasn't been directly copied by anyone that I know of (yet). I occasionally see a new artist who I know is familiar with my work playing with similar concepts, but I would never claim to have invented those techniques in a field as ancient as textiles. To a certain extent, that's part of the process of give and take that goes along with any creative work.

 Photo credit: Kennett Mohrman with art direction by Elizabeth Sonenfeld

Photo credit: Kennett Mohrman with art direction by Elizabeth Sonenfeld

5. Do you have any advice for aspiring artists or creative business people?

Remember that there is always a hidden side to your favorite artists or businesses. Behind what is shared on social media, there are a lot of late nights and self-doubt. No one ever begins as an expert at their craft. You have to start somewhere, and the best way to do that is just to start. Everything you think is cool is being done by someone a lot like you.

FINAL_SC_KnitPaint_Grp_01.jpg
 Photo credit: Kennett Mohrman with art direction by Elizabeth Sonenfeld
 Photo credit: Kennett Mohrman with art direction by Elizabeth Sonenfeld

Photo credit: Kennett Mohrman with art direction by Elizabeth Sonenfeld

FINAL_SC_Indigo_Grp_03.jpg
 Photo credit: Kennett Mohrman with art direction by Elizabeth Sonenfeld

Photo credit: Kennett Mohrman with art direction by Elizabeth Sonenfeld

puffsdetail.jpg

All images provided by the artist.